Disney College Program

The Disney College Program is a US national internship program operated by The Walt Disney Company , located On at the Walt Disney World Resort and the Disneyland Resort . The Disney College Recruitment Program (18 years and older) and all majors for a semester-long paid internship program at the Walt Disney World Resort or Disneyland Resort

History

The first Disney College Program began in 1981. In the early days, the College Program consisted of just over 200 students from 20 schools working in only one theme park, the Magic Kingdom . [1] At That Time It was Known As The Magic Kingdom College Program (MKCP) . In October 1982, program participants could work at Epcot as well as the program was known as the Walt Disney World College Program , [2] employing approximately 500 college students each spring, summer and fall session. From the beginning of the program until 1988, Almost all program participants stayed in an off-property mobile home park called Snow White Village Campground in Kissimmee, Florida . 1987 saw the opening of Vista Way apartments, which were much closer to the participants’ employment. [3] Following the resort’s massive growth in the 1990s and the widespread popularity of the internet, the College Program has grown substantially, seeing three new participants. As of 2005, 8,000 students have participated each year, representing at least 301 colleges and universities [1] [4] with an average of 4,000 students at any given time. [5] [3] Following the resort’s massive growth in the 1990s and the widespread popularity of the internet, the College Program has grown substantially, seeing three new participants. As of 2005, 8,000 students have participated each year, representing at least 301 colleges and universities [1] [4] with an average of 4,000 students at any given time. [5] [3] Following the resort’s massive growth in the 1990s and the widespread popularity of the internet, the College Program has grown substantially, seeing three new participants. As of 2005, 8,000 students have participated each year, representing at least 301 colleges and universities [1] [4] with an average of 4,000 students at any given time. [5] Representing at least 301 colleges and universities [1] [4] with an average of 4,000 students at any given time. [5] Representing at least 301 colleges and universities [1] [4] with an average of 4,000 students at any given time. [5]

In the Autumn of 2004, Disneyland’s student opportunities were combined with the opportunities available at Walt Disney World. The program was renamed to the Disney Theme Parks and Resorts College Program . Currently, the program is being promoted as, simply, the Disney College Program .

Application process

The Disney College Program. All students must be 18 years old or older before the expected day of arrival. Students must be enrolled in an accredited university or college as a full-time or part-time student, and actively taking classes. Students may also participate in the semester immediately following graduation. The Disney College Program is a program that allows students to take part in a variety of programs and activities. In the case of schools with other requirements, a student must meet all of those eligibilities before being considered by the program. [6]

Students who apply to the program are given the option of one of several programs throughout the year.

After the general application is filed, students may be selected to participate in a web-based interview. This can happen immediately or months later. Students who are selected to proceed beyond the web-based interview then go through a second round over the phone. Here the students clarify with recruiters which of the roles they would be receptive to while attending the program. Some of these roles (or positions) are food and beverage, attractions, custodial, hospitality, merchandise, and entertainment. If a student chooses to apply for an entertainment role, he or she must expect one of several regional auditions. At one point, however, it was a required view of a presentation, however, as of the Fall 2013 application period that is no longer a requirement.

The term “notification” is used to describe the status of a person or group of persons.

Program information

At the beginning of the program in the early 1980s, three “experiments” were emphasized: “The Learning Experience”, which involved participation in Disney’s “Leisure Time Business Management Studies” The resort, and “The Recreational Experience” which emphasizes recreational activities and Disney-sponsored events. [2] Since then, the experiments have changed slightly to “living”, “learning” and “earning”. [7]

The “Living” experience is similar to the original program’s “Recreational” experience. The Walt Disney World Resort is located in Chatham Square, Patterson Court, and the Commons (which houses mainly international Cast Members). At the Disneyland Resort, participants stay in the Carnegie Plaza building about two miles north of the resort. Each participant can choose to live in one, two, three or four bedroom apartment with two to three people per bedroom. [8] In addition to these options, the Disneyland offers a limited number of studio-style apartments.

The cost of housing is deducted automatically from the student’s weekly salary. The cost of housing varies depending on the rental location. There are a lot of places to stay in the area. In Florida there is a nonrefundable program fee of $ 100, which covers 2 weeks’ rent. In California the program assessment fee is $ 100, with a refundable security deposit of $ 200 as well as $ 560 in housing and assessment fees which covers 4 weeks’ rent. [9]

Students are expected to follow certain guidelines in the housing complexes. Roommates are assigned by gender and age, except in the case of a married couple. If a student is under the age of 21, they are automatically placed in a “Wellness Apartment”, which is deemed alcohol-free. For students located in Florida the Disney Company provides transportation to and from the theme parks. Transportation is not provided for students located in California. Those students are encouraged to bring their own cars. They are also given free passes for the OCTA public transportation system, and earn $ 1 each day the pass is used. [10]

The “Learning” experience began in the early 80s as a group of 9 seminars on the “philosophies and operating practices” of the various sections of their resort’s business. [2] It has grown to include 8 different races, each focusing on a Disney topic, rather than a business area. The students are required to write text papers and participate on projects. Additionally, there are now Disney Exploration Series races, which are more focused on business areas as they relate to Disney. Participants, just like every Cast Member, expects Traditions, which is a 4 hour long orientation that demonstrates everything about the Resort of employment and the company in general. [11] The Disney Look is required for attendance at Traditions, Which is the participants’ first official day of work. The program also offers “job shadowing” for participants on the day they are not working – the participant can follow Disney Cast [12] Most of the courses are approved by the American Council on Education and Participants’ participation in college or university. [13] The classes are designed to meet once a week, for most of the program and are four hours long. Disney Cast is a member of the Disney Association of Canada. [12] Most of the courses are approved by the American Council on Education and Participants’ participation in college or university. [13] The classes are designed to meet once a week, for most of the program and are four hours long. Disney Cast is a member of the Disney Association of Canada. [12] Most of the courses are approved by the American Council on Education and Participants’ participation in college or university. [13] The classes are designed to meet once a week, for most of the program and are four hours long.

The “Earning” experience consists of students working within their resort. [14] Food, Merchandise, Attractions, and Custodial. [2] Currently, Disney College Program students work in more than 20 different roles.

Depending on the requirements of a student’s school, internship credit may be earned. [15]

See also

  • Walt Disney World International Program

References

  1. ^ Jump up to:a b Nichols, Amy (2001-10-30). “Opportunities await Disney College Program participants” . Http://dailynebraskan.com . Retrieved 2009-03-06 . External link in ( help ) |publisher=
  2. ^ Jump up to:a b c d Walt Disney World College Program (brochure) . Walt Disney Productions. 1983.
  3. Jump up^ Mobley, Glenn (1998-04-27). MKCP 10 Year Anniversary Newsletter: Summer of ’87 . Glenn Mobley and Robin Quick-Brantley. p. 3.
  4. Jump up^ Associated Press (2005-07-05). “Disney internships draw students, criticism” . Http://msnbc.msn.com . Retrieved 2009-03-05 . External link in( help ) |publisher=
  5. Jump up^ Billman, Jeffrey (2007-12-27). “Of Mouse and Man” . Http://orlandoweekly.com . Retrieved 2009-03-06 . External link in( help ) |publisher=
  6. Jump up^ “Disney Application Requirements” .
  7. Jump up^ “Disney College Program Overview” . Disney . Retrieved 2009-03-05 .
  8. Jump up^ “Working: A Unique Working Experience” . ” Disney ” . Retrieved 2010-11-30 .
  9. Jump up^ “Disney College Program Fees” .
  10. Jump up^ “Living Policies” .
  11. Jump up^ “Education Overview” . Disney . Retrieved 2009-03-05 .
  12. Jump up^ Jewett, Brandi (2008-09-30). “Disney College Program offers students ‘dynamic’ opportunities . Http://dakotastudent.com . Retrieved 2009-03-05 . External link in( help ) |publisher=
  13. Jump up^ “Education” . ” Disney ” . Retrieved 2010-11-30 .
  14. Jump up^ “Working: Real World Experience” . Disney . Retrieved 2009-03-05 .
  15. Jump up^ “Disney College Program” . Http://realvacationscheap.wordpress.com . 2009-03-02 . Retrieved 2009-03-05 . External link in( help ) |publisher=

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